class Sequel::Schema::AlterTableGenerator

  1. lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
Superclass: Object

Schema::AlterTableGenerator is an internal class that the user is not expected to instantiate directly. Instances are created by Database#alter_table. It is used to specify table alteration parameters. It takes a Database object and a block of operations to perform on the table, and gives the Database an array of table altering operations, which the database uses to alter a table's description.

For more information on Sequel's support for schema modification, see the “Schema Modification” guide.

Attributes

operations [R]

An array of operations to perform

Public Class methods

new(db, &block)

Set the Database object to which to apply the changes, and evaluate the block in the context of this object.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
383 def initialize(db, &block)
384   @db = db
385   @operations = []
386   instance_exec(&block) if block
387 end

Public Instance methods

add_column(name, type, opts = OPTS)

Add a column with the given name, type, and opts. See CreateTableGenerator#column for the available options (except for :index, use a separate add_index call to add an index for the column).

add_column(:name, String) # ADD COLUMN name varchar(255)

PostgreSQL specific options:

:if_not_exists

Set to true to not add the column if it already exists (PostgreSQL 9.6+)

MySQL specific options:

:after

The name of an existing column that the new column should be positioned after

:first

Create this new column before all other existing columns

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
403 def add_column(name, type, opts = OPTS)
404   @operations << {:op => :add_column, :name => name, :type => type}.merge!(opts)
405   nil
406 end
add_constraint(name, *args, &block)

Add a constraint with the given name and args. See CreateTableGenerator#constraint.

add_constraint(:valid_name, Sequel.like(:name, 'A%'))
# ADD CONSTRAINT valid_name CHECK (name LIKE 'A%' ESCAPE '\')
add_constraint({name: :valid_name, deferrable: true}, Sequel.like(:name, 'A%'))
# ADD CONSTRAINT valid_name CHECK (name LIKE 'A%' ESCAPE '\') DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
415 def add_constraint(name, *args, &block)
416   opts = name.is_a?(Hash) ? name : {:name=>name}
417   @operations << opts.merge(:op=>:add_constraint, :type=>:check, :check=>block || args)
418   nil
419 end
add_foreign_key(name, table, opts = OPTS)

Add a foreign key with the given name and referencing the given table. See CreateTableGenerator#column for the available options (except for :index, use a separate add_index call to add an index for the column).

You can also pass an array of column names for creating composite foreign keys. In this case, it will assume the columns exist and will only add the constraint. You can provide a :name option to name the constraint.

NOTE: If you need to add a foreign key constraint to a single existing column use the composite key syntax even if it is only one column.

add_foreign_key(:artist_id, :table) # ADD COLUMN artist_id integer REFERENCES table
add_foreign_key([:name], :table) # ADD FOREIGN KEY (name) REFERENCES table

PostgreSQL specific options:

:not_valid

Set to true to add the constraint with the NOT VALID syntax. This makes it so that future inserts must respect referential integrity, but allows the constraint to be added even if existing column values reference rows that do not exist. After all the existing data has been cleaned up, validate_constraint can be used to mark the constraint as valid. Note that this option only makes sense when using an array of columns.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
455 def add_foreign_key(name, table, opts = OPTS)
456   return add_composite_foreign_key(name, table, opts) if name.is_a?(Array)
457   add_column(name, Integer, {:table=>table}.merge!(opts))
458 end
add_full_text_index(columns, opts = OPTS)

Add a full text index on the given columns. See CreateTableGenerator#full_text_index for available options.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
462 def add_full_text_index(columns, opts = OPTS)
463   add_index(columns, {:type=>:full_text}.merge!(opts))
464 end
add_index(columns, opts = OPTS)

Add an index on the given columns. See CreateTableGenerator#index for available options.

add_index(:artist_id) # CREATE INDEX table_artist_id_index ON table (artist_id)
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
470 def add_index(columns, opts = OPTS)
471   @operations << {:op => :add_index, :columns => Array(columns)}.merge!(opts)
472   nil
473 end
add_primary_key(name, opts = OPTS)

Add a primary key. See CreateTableGenerator#column for the available options. Like add_foreign_key, if you specify the column name as an array, it just creates a constraint:

add_primary_key(:id) # ADD COLUMN id serial PRIMARY KEY
add_primary_key([:artist_id, :name]) # ADD PRIMARY KEY (artist_id, name)
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
481 def add_primary_key(name, opts = OPTS)
482   return add_composite_primary_key(name, opts) if name.is_a?(Array)
483   opts = @db.serial_primary_key_options.merge(opts)
484   add_column(name, opts.delete(:type), opts)
485 end
add_spatial_index(columns, opts = OPTS)

Add a spatial index on the given columns. See CreateTableGenerator#index for available options.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
489 def add_spatial_index(columns, opts = OPTS)
490   add_index(columns, {:type=>:spatial}.merge!(opts))
491 end
add_unique_constraint(columns, opts = OPTS)

Add a unique constraint to the given column(s)

add_unique_constraint(:name) # ADD UNIQUE (name)
add_unique_constraint(:name, name: :unique_name) # ADD CONSTRAINT unique_name UNIQUE (name)

Supports the same :deferrable option as CreateTableGenerator#column.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
427 def add_unique_constraint(columns, opts = OPTS)
428   @operations << {:op => :add_constraint, :type => :unique, :columns => Array(columns)}.merge!(opts)
429   nil
430 end
drop_column(name, opts=OPTS)

Remove a column from the table.

drop_column(:artist_id) # DROP COLUMN artist_id
drop_column(:artist_id, cascade: true) # DROP COLUMN artist_id CASCADE

Options:

:cascade

CASCADE the operation, dropping other objects that depend on the dropped column.

PostgreSQL specific options:

:if_exists

Use IF EXISTS, so no error is raised if the column does not exist.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
506 def drop_column(name, opts=OPTS)
507   @operations << {:op => :drop_column, :name => name}.merge!(opts)
508   nil
509 end
drop_constraint(name, opts=OPTS)

Remove a constraint from the table:

drop_constraint(:unique_name) # DROP CONSTRAINT unique_name
drop_constraint(:unique_name, cascade: true) # DROP CONSTRAINT unique_name CASCADE

MySQL/SQLite specific options:

:type

Set the type of constraint to drop, either :primary_key, :foreign_key, or :unique.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
520 def drop_constraint(name, opts=OPTS)
521   @operations << {:op => :drop_constraint, :name => name}.merge!(opts)
522   nil
523 end
drop_foreign_key(name, opts=OPTS)

Remove a foreign key and the associated column from the table. General options:

:name

The name of the constraint to drop. If not given, uses the same name that would be used by add_foreign_key with the same columns.

NOTE: If you want to drop only the foreign key constraint but keep the column, use the composite key syntax even if it is only one column.

drop_foreign_key(:artist_id) # DROP CONSTRAINT table_artist_id_fkey, DROP COLUMN artist_id
drop_foreign_key([:name]) # DROP CONSTRAINT table_name_fkey
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
535 def drop_foreign_key(name, opts=OPTS)
536   if !name.is_a?(Array) && opts[:foreign_key_constraint_name]
537     opts = Hash[opts]
538     opts[:name] = opts[:foreign_key_constraint_name]
539   end
540   drop_composite_foreign_key(Array(name), opts)
541   drop_column(name) unless name.is_a?(Array)
542 end
drop_index(columns, options=OPTS)

Remove an index from the table. General options:

:name

The name of the index to drop. If not given, uses the same name that would be used by add_index with the same columns.

PostgreSQL specific options:

:cascade

Cascade the index drop to dependent objects.

:concurrently

Drop the index using CONCURRENTLY, which doesn't block operations on the table. Supported in PostgreSQL 9.2+.

:if_exists

Only drop the index if it already exists.

drop_index(:artist_id) # DROP INDEX table_artist_id_index
drop_index([:a, :b]) # DROP INDEX table_a_b_index
drop_index([:a, :b], name: :foo) # DROP INDEX foo
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
559 def drop_index(columns, options=OPTS)
560   @operations << {:op => :drop_index, :columns => Array(columns)}.merge!(options)
561   nil
562 end
rename_column(name, new_name, opts = OPTS)

Rename one of the table's columns.

rename_column(:name, :artist_name) # RENAME COLUMN name TO artist_name
[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
567 def rename_column(name, new_name, opts = OPTS)
568   @operations << {:op => :rename_column, :name => name, :new_name => new_name}.merge!(opts)
569   nil
570 end
set_column_allow_null(name, allow_null=true)

Set a given column as allowing NULL values.

set_column_allow_null(:artist_name) # ALTER COLUMN artist_name DROP NOT NULL

On MySQL, make sure to use a symbol for the name of the column, as otherwise you can lose the default and type for the column.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
608 def set_column_allow_null(name, allow_null=true)
609   @operations << {:op => :set_column_null, :name => name, :null => allow_null}
610   nil
611 end
set_column_default(name, default)

Modify the default value for one of the table's column.

set_column_default(:artist_name, 'a') # ALTER COLUMN artist_name SET DEFAULT 'a'

To remove an existing default value, use nil as the value:

set_column_default(:artist_name, nil) # ALTER COLUMN artist_name SET DEFAULT NULL

On MySQL, make sure to use a symbol for the name of the column, as otherwise you can lose the type and NULL/NOT NULL setting for the column.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
582 def set_column_default(name, default)
583   @operations << {:op => :set_column_default, :name => name, :default => default}
584   nil
585 end
set_column_not_null(name)

Set a given column as not allowing NULL values.

set_column_not_null(:artist_name) # ALTER COLUMN artist_name SET NOT NULL

On MySQL, make sure to use a symbol for the name of the column, as otherwise you can lose the default and type for the column.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
619 def set_column_not_null(name)
620   set_column_allow_null(name, false)
621 end
set_column_type(name, type, opts=OPTS)

Modify the type of one of the table's column.

set_column_type(:artist_name, 'char(10)') # ALTER COLUMN artist_name TYPE char(10)

PostgreSQL specific options:

:using

Add a USING clause that specifies how to convert existing values to new values.

On MySQL, make sure to use a symbol for the name of the column, as otherwise you can lose the default and NULL/NOT NULL setting for the column.

[show source]
    # File lib/sequel/database/schema_generator.rb
597 def set_column_type(name, type, opts=OPTS)
598   @operations << {:op => :set_column_type, :name => name, :type => type}.merge!(opts)
599   nil
600 end