extensions.rdoc

doc/extensions.rdoc
Last Update: 2014-08-27 16:49:13 -0700

Sequel Extensions

Sequel has an official extension system, for adding global, Database, and Dataset extensions.

Global Extensions

Global extensions can add or modify the behavior of any part of Sequel. Technically, they are not limited to affecting Sequel, as they can also modify code outside of Sequel (e.g. the blank extension). However, extensions that modify things outside of Sequel generally do so only for backwards compatibility.

Global extensions are loaded via Sequel.extension:

Sequel.extension :named_timezones

What this does is require the relevent extension from sequel/extensions/named_timezones somewhere in the ruby path. Actually, that is all that does. Global extensions are just a simpler, consistent way to require code that modifies Sequel.

Database Extensions

Database extensions should add or modify the behavior of a single Sequel::Database instance. They are loaded via Sequel::Database#extension:

DB.extension :server_block

The first thing that this does is load the relevent extension globally. However, Database extensions should be structured in a way that loading the relevent extension globally just adds a module with the related behavior, it doesn't modify any other state. After loading the extension globally, it modifies the related Sequel::Database object to modify it's behavior, usually by extending it with a module.

If you want a Database extension loaded into all future Database instances, you can use Sequel::Database.extension:

Sequel::Database.extension :server_block

All future Sequel::Database instances created afterward will then automatically have the server_block extension loaded.

Dataset Extensions

Dataset extensions should add or modify the behavior of a single Sequel::Dataset instance. They are loaded via Sequel::Dataset#extension or Sequel::Dataset#extension!. Sequel::Dataset#extension returns a modifies copy of the dataset that includes the extension (similar to how most dataset query methods work):

ds = DB[:a].extension(:columns_introspection)

Sequel::Dataset#extension! modifies a dataset to include the extension (similar to how dataset mutation methods work):

ds = DB[:a]
ds.extension!(:columns_introspection)

It is recommended you only use Sequel::Dataset#extension! if you have good reasons to.

The first thing loading a Dataset extension does is load the relevent extension globally. Similar to Database extensions, loading a Dataset extension globally should not affect state other than maybe adding a module. After loading the extension globally, it modifies the related Sequel::Dataset instance to modify its behavior.

If you want to load an extension into all future datasets for a given Sequel::Database instance, you can also load it as a Database extension:

DB.extension :columns_introspection

Likewise, if you want to load an extension into all future datasets for all future databases, you can load it via Sequel::Database.extension:

Sequel::Database.extension :columns_introspection

Creating Global Extensions

If you want to create a global extension, you just need to store your code so that you can require it via sequel/extensions/extension_name. Then users can load it via:

Sequel.extension :extension_name

It is recommended you only create a global extension if what you want to do would not work as a Database or Dataset extension.

Creating Database Extensions

Creating Database extensions is similar to global extensions in terms of creating the file. However, somewhere in the file, you need to call Sequel::Database.register_extension. Usually you would call this with the module that will be added to the related Sequel::Database instance when the extension is loaded. For example, the server_block extension uses something like:

Sequel::Database.register_extension(:server_block, Sequel::ServerBlock)

The first argument is the name of the extension as a symbol, and the second is the module.

In some cases, just extending the Sequel::Database instance with a module is not sufficient. So Sequel::Database.register_extension also accepts a proc instead of a second argument. This proc is called with the Sequel::Database instance, and can then run any related code:

Sequel::Database.register_extension(:arbitrary_servers){|db| db.pool.extend(Sequel::ArbitraryServers)}

Creating Dataset Extensions

Creating Dataset extensions is very similar to creating Database extensions, but instead of calling Sequel::Database.register_extension, you call Sequel::Dataset.register_extension. In general, you would call this with the module that will be added to the related Sequel::Dataset instance when the extension is loaded. For example, the columns_introspection extension uses something like:

Sequel::Dataset.register_extension(:columns_introspection, Sequel::ColumnsIntrospection)

The first argument is the name of the extension as a symbol, and the second is the module. When you call the Sequel::Dataset.register_extension method with a module, it in turn calls Sequel::Database.register_extension and adds a Database extension that loads this Dataset extension into all future Datasets created from the Database.

You can also call Sequel::Dataset.register_extension with a proc:

Sequel::Dataset.register_extension(:extension_name){|ds| }

Note that if you use a proc, a corresponding Database extension will not be created automatically (you can still call Sequel::Database.register_extension manually in this case).